A Simple Guide To Gluten-Free Eating - myfryingpan

A Simple Guide To Gluten-Free Eating


More and more people in the world today are suffering from celiac disease or some form of gluten intolerance (sometimes without even knowing). People are opting for gluten-free options to figure out the root cause of their problems. We have collected more information for you to learn about gluten and tips on how to avoid it. 

What is Gluten? 

Wheat, barley, and oats all share a specific protein called gluten. You’ll find gluten in any foods containing these ingredients, as well as some you wouldn’t expect, such as soups, salad dressings, lunch meats, gravies, and sauces. 

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Celiac Disease

Celiac disease, an autoimmune genetic disorder, causes sufferers to have severe reactions when eating gluten. Even a minute amount of gluten causes an attack response, causing damage to the lining of the small intestines. This can lead to other symptoms, such as abdominal pain, rashes, joint pain, unexplained iron deficiency, fatigue, osteoporosis, and anemia. The only way to manage the severe symptoms of celiac disease and promote healing is to adopt a gluten-free diet. 

How To Go Gluten-Free

Prepping Your Kitchen

When you share a kitchen with others who aren’t on a gluten-free diet, it’s a good idea to take these steps to ensure you don’t get any gluten in your food. 

  • Separate gluten-free foods from foods that contain gluten. 
  • Designate gluten-free kitchenware – utensils, cutting boards, and appliances (e.g. toasters)
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Gluten-Free Foods

It’s easy to get discouraged when you think of all the foods that are off-limits, so we’d rather bring your attention to all the yummy foods you can eat!

  • Unprocessed fruit and veg, including potatoes and sweet potatoes.
  • Dairy products are generally gluten-free, although some blue cheeses can be made with wheat.
  • Red meats, poultry, fish, and beans are all on the table. Check canned or frozen food just to be sure.
  • Legumes and nuts are great alternative protein sources.
  • Gluten-free grains such as rice, millet, quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat. 
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If ever you’re unsure of the gluten content of a product, contact the manufacturers to ask.